Incoming students take part in Amazing Race event at Glace Bay High

06 Sep 2017

GLACE BAY, N.S. — One might say some former Grade 9 students who will be entering Glace Bay High School Thursday got a first hand peek at the school in an amazing way.

More than 50 former Grade 9 students destined for Grade 10 at GBHS recently spent a day at the school for the Amazing Race Glace Bay High Edition.

See URL for full news article: http://www.capebretonpost.com/news/local/2017/9/4/incoming-students-take-part-in-amazing-race-event-at-glace-bay-h.html


Working to Improve Mental Health Care, Op-ed

15 Aug 2017

The following is an op-ed piece by Health and Wellness Minister Randy Delorey: https://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20170815002


Support for Student and Family Mental Health from NS Road Builders Association

18 May 2017

AVRSB’s SchoolsPlus Annapolis has received a generous donation from the Nova Scotia Road Builders Association, aimed at supporting student and family mental health initiatives.

See URL for full news article: https://www.avrsb.ca/article/support-student-and-family-mental-health-ns-road-builders-association

 


Government Responds to Mental Health Panel

21 Mar 2017

Government Responds to Mental Health Panel

News Release

Health and Wellness
March 20, 2017 9:34am

 


Headstrong Summit coming to Pictou County this week

03 Mar 2017

Headstrong Summit coming to Pictou County this week

Students in Pictou County are coming together to attend the Headstrong Summit to learn how to reduce stigma toward mental illness.

www.ngnews.ca
Nov 15, 2016
Article on The New Glasgow News website regarding the Headstrong Summit in Pictou.

http://www.ngnews.ca/news/local/2016/11/15/headstrong-summit-coming-to-pictou-county-this-week.html

 


The Kids Are Alright! Youth Engagement in Cumberland County - EAC Our Food Project

20 Jul 2016

The Kids Are Alright! Youth Engagement in Cumberland County - EAC Our Food Project


Des jardiniers en herbe à Beau-Port_A

18 Jul 2016

Des jardiniers en herbe à Beau-Port_A

Le Courrier de la Nouvelle-Écosse, Le vendredi 8 kuillet 2016

Arichat

l'École Beau-Port


Article camp ESM - Apprendre l'entrepreneuriat a un jeune age - Meteghan ÉcolesPlus

30 Jun 2016

Article camp ESM - Apprendre l'entrepreneuriat a un jeune age - Meteghan ÉcolesPlus


MLAs announce new hub HRSB

16 May 2016

MLAs announce new hub in HRSB


Province develops sexual violence fund

14 Apr 2016

Province develops sexual violence fund

Chronicle Herald limited April 13th


SP Bicentennial School article in Echo feb 2016 - Navigating to success in school

04 Apr 2016

SP Bicentennial School article in Echo feb 2016 - Navigating to success in school


Big Brothers, Big Sisters recruiting volunteers

25 Nov 2015

Lieutenant Governor's Respectful Citizenship Award

05 Oct 2015

EDUCATION/EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT--Nominate a Student Making a Positive Difference for Respectful Citizenship Award

------------------------------------------------------------

Everyday students in Nova Scotia are making positive contributions to benefit their schools and communities and each year Nova Scotians have a chance to show them it is appreciated.

Nominations are open for the Lieutenant Governor's Respectful Citizenship Award. The award recognizes students from around the province who demonstrate excellent leadership and a strong commitment to creating safe and inclusive spaces in schools and communities.

Promoting Mi'kmaq culture, fighting poverty and raising awareness of issues facing the transgender community are some of the ways past award recipients have promoted respectful citizenship.

"It is important for us to recognize the leaders of tomorrow, especially those who are making a difference in their schools and communities today," said Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant. "I am delighted that this award seeks out those who are playing an important role in enhancing the lives of their fellow students in such an important manner."

The award is given annually to up to 20 students in Primary to Grade 12 in the public school system, private school system or home school.

An individual award and a group award can be given to students in each of the eight school boards and the Mi'Kmaw Kina'matnewey Board. An additional two awards can be given to students enrolled in private school or home schooled and registered with the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.

Nominations must include a description of their role in the project or activity explaining how it supports the promotion of safe and inclusive communities and must be accompanied by two references.

Nomination forms have been sent to schools and can be found at http://antibullying.novascotia.ca . The deadline for nominations is Friday, Nov. 20.

 

Media Contact: Michelle Lucas

               902-424-8307

               Cell: 902-222-1784

               Email: Michelle.L.Lucas@novascotia.ca

 

 


SchoolsPlus/RCMP Day Camp Activities - July 2015

05 Aug 2015

SchoolsPlus/RCMP Day Camp Activities - July 14, 2015

05 Aug 2015

SchoolsPlus HRSB Newsletter - June Edition, 2015

22 Jun 2015

SchoolsPlus Expansion Brings Program to Every County

22 Jun 2015

SchoolsPlus Expansion Brings Program to Every County Education and Early Childhood Development June 18, 2015 1:05 PM ________________________________________ NOTE: A list of the new SchoolsPlus sites follows this release. ________________________________________ Students and families in every county of Nova Scotia will benefit from greater access to support services and after-school programs with the expansion of SchoolsPlus to 29 more schools. "I've always believed that education is the cornerstone of our province's future success," said Premier Stephen McNeil. "SchoolsPlus offers students and their families the support and services they need, in a safe, inclusive space and this expansion means those services will be more accessible than ever before." The premier was at Tallahassee Community School in Eastern Passage, today, June 18, with Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey, to announce the four new hub sites as part of the SchoolsPlus expansion. The new hub sites are: -- Dr. T.L. Sullivan Junior High School, Florence, Cape Breton Regional Municipality, which will also serve nine other schools -- École secondaire du Sommet, Halifax, which will serve two other schools -- Tallahassee Community School, Eastern Passage, which will serve nine other schools -- Park View Education Centre, Bridgewater, Lunenburg Co., which will serve three other schools The existing Conseil scolaire acadien provincial (CSAP) hub sites will add two new schools, École NDA in Chéticamp, Inverness Co. and Centre scolaire de la Rive-Sud in Cookville, Lunenburg Co. SchoolsPlus brings a range of mental health services and other health programs together with mentoring, social work, homework support and justice services into schools where students and families can easily access them. Each hub site acts as a base for services at multiple schools. "SchoolsPlus forms the back bone to many initiatives in the South Shore Regional School Board that allow students to become more confident and develop new skills," said Braden Newell, a Grade 11 student at Park View Education Centre. "Through SchoolPlus, I have been able to develop my public speaking skills, meet some amazing new people, develop technology skills and become certified in restorative justice." SchoolsPlus is available in all eight school boards and every county in Nova Scotia, providing services to 182 schools.


West Highlands School Officially Opened in Amherst

10 Jun 2015

EDUCATION/EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT--West Highlands School Officially Opened in Amherst ----------------------------------------------------------------- Students, staff and community members from Amherst celebrated the official opening of West Highlands School, today, June 8. Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey was joined by students and representatives from the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board, the Town of Amherst and departments of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal and Education and Early Childhood Development. "For decades, Amherst's students have received a strong start in school at West Highlands," said Ms. Casey. "That strong start will continue at the new West Highlands School, a modern school built through collaboration with the school board and community." The province invested $11.9 million with additional contributions from the Town of Amherst and local community for a larger gymnasium. The school also features a music room, visual arts room, Early Years Centre, SchoolsPlus area and sports field. The school serves students from grades Primary to 6. "A new school is always exciting, but I think this new school means a little more to us because we have moved from a facility that was over 100 years-old, to a state-of-the-art space," said Kevin Mapplebeck, principal, West Highlands School. "This new school provides our students with boundless opportunities to learn and grow. We couldn't be more excited." To connect the new school with its historic predecessor, the bell from the old West Highlands Elementary School has been restored and is now in a prominent location in the lobby of the new school. "West Highlands School is a modern facility that's very welcoming for students, staff and visitors alike," said Trudy Thompson, chair of the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board. "West Highlands is home to our board's first Early Years Centre and a SchoolsPlus site, two very important services for students and their families." -----------------------------------------------------------------


Report from the Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health

21 Apr 2015

Report from the Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health
BY
DR. STAN KUTCHER,
SUN LIFE FINANCIAL CHAIR IN ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH
 
The Sun Life Financial Chair team has been working on a number of new initiatives and expanding its programs to other parts of Canada and abroad. One of the new projects
is the development of a pre-service teacher mental health literacy curriculum resource that will be made available to all Canadian faculties of education for their use. The background work on this project has seen the Chair leading a consortium of faculties of education from three universities: St. Francis Xavier; University of Western Ontario; and University of British Columbia. This has included involving over 30 other Faculties of Education across Canada
as Participant Observers. This group will now move ahead to continue its work with applications to create and distribute the curriculum. In Nova Scotia, the Chair has continued to partner with SchoolsPlus on the training of “Go-To Educators” (teachers and other key school
personnel who are trained to identify, triage and support young people who may be at high risk for a mental disorder). At this time, over 800 “Go-To Educators” have been trained and are applying their skills in both junior high and secondary schools across the province. In Alberta, this program has been rolled out in a number of school boards in the Calgary region with over 900 teachers trained there. Data collected to date by the University of Calgary researchers has demonstrated highly significant and very substantial improvements in outcomes of program participants. The New Year will see the beginning of this program and training in the mental health literacy curriculum resource starting in British Columbia and the Yukon with increased applications in Manitoba and Ontario. Dr. Kutcher also continues his work as co-lead of the Mental Health Section of the national Sandbox Project. Originally established by the Hon. Dr. Kellie Leitch, the Sandbox Project is dedicated to improving health outcomes for Canadian children, youth and their families. In this role, he is advancing a novel approach to youth mental health clinical care in primary health and community settings. This involves the development and testing of a mobile application and web-based electronic illness self-management and intervention tool linked to health care providers in real-time and supported by clinical care direction resources. All this is also designed to be able to “sit” on an electronic personal health record to be used to direct, monitor and improve mental health care of young people. Evaluation of this approach will begin early in the New Year in Kingston, Ontario and Dr. Kutcher is hopeful that success in that phase will lead to further developments that can be delivered here in Nova Scotia and simultaneously in other parts of Canada as well.


SchoolsPlus: Building Resiliency and Hope

21 Apr 2015

 

Schools Plus: Building resiliency and hope

CCRSB News: 

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

The Community Room at Amherst Regional High School (ARHS) is a busy place. The TV is on, music is playing and the room is almost always full of students, and Marvin Hairston. Marvin is the community outreach worker for the SchoolsPlus hub site at ARHS and is one of three community outreach workers at SchoolsPlus sites in CCRSB.
CCRSB’s SchoolsPlus hub sites are located at ARHS, Truro Junior High School and New Glasgow Academy and a fourth site, in the Nova Family, is due to come online in the 2016-2017 school year. That’s good news for students and their families, as each SchoolsPlus hub site provides service to the elementary and middle schools around it (sometimes as many as six).
The work that Marvin and other community outreach workers do varies day-to-day, hour-to-hour. It has to. That flexibility is the key to providing students and families with the support they need, in the way they need it.
“What I do on a day-to-day basis depends on the needs of the schools and families we work with,” said Marvin. “Mornings, before school, I am often trying to pull students out of bed and convince them to go to school. At other times throughout the school day I may be facilitating a program like SkatePass (in physical education classes), Options 2 Anger, or Friends for Life (anxiety prevention) in one of our six schools.” 
Marvin’s energy, enthusiasm and passion for helping students and their families is shared by his SchoolsPlus team members in Amherst: Kim Wood, facilitator, and Robin Greene, mental health clinician. Together, Kim, Robin and Marvin work to make the Amherst SchoolsPlus site a safe-haven for students and their families; a place and a space where access to services through departments like Community Services, Public Health and Justice is streamlined and easily accessible. That’s called wraparound service and it is the key to complex case management, the foundation on which SchoolsPlus was built.
Complex cases mean that a student has involvement with multiple service departments of government, at the same time. “Students get referred to SchoolsPlus when they are involved with multiple services, that may not be making the positive change that the family is looking for,” said Wood. “By helping families navigate those many services it reduces frustrations and allows for work to begin much more quickly.” SchoolsPlus sites offer a space where families can meet with multiple agencies at the same time helping to eliminate some of the more common barriers, like travel time and costs. 
“The client is the family, the student needing the direct service is at the centre, but to effect any real change you have to work with the whole family,” said Greene.
The connections made between SchoolsPlus sites and community partners translates to enhanced support for students and families who find themselves in crisis, or need. “The Celtic Family of Schools currently have a great working relationship with all agencies that provide services to children and youth through Pictou County Partners,” said Ron Turnbull, Celtic Family of Schools supervisor. “The implementation of SchoolsPlus will further strengthen and enhance the interagency collaboration that already exists which will be of great benefit in supporting students and families.” 
SchoolsPlus staff members are witness to heartbreak and triumph. Last year at ARHS, Kim and her team delighted in the graduation of a student who had been involved with SchoolsPlus since junior high. For some students progress is graduation. For other students progress is just coming to school. 
“Progress is determined case-by-case. Ultimately it’s about building resiliency in students, helping and supporting them to make the right decisions,” said Greene. “Success is seeing a student make the right decision, the right choice for them. That means everything. We celebrate everything, all the small steps are important.”
SchoolsPlus staff members are supported in their work by an advisory council. Made up of representatives from partner agencies and departments – like Justice, Community Services, Public Health and Addictions Services – the council comes together once a month to review the active cases and discuss the best path forward for each student.
Tracey Shay is the SchoolsPlus Facilitator for Truro. She sees the role of the Advisory Council as indispensable. "One of the strengths of the SchoolsPlus program is the role of the Advisory Council. We are very fortunate to have a variety of senior managers on our committee from multiple government departments, as well as the Colchester Health Authority, the Truro Police, and the John Howard Society. All of these people play a critical role in helping us provide an approach that is based on collaborative problem solving. Having a multidisciplinary voice at the table allows us to explore issues and concerns in a way that we otherwise would not be able to do."
The challenges for SchoolsPlus staff members are many, but the rewards are outstanding. A world without SchoolsPlus, for many students, would be bleak.
“I think there would be a noticeable difference in Amherst without the presence of SchoolsPlus. I believe there would be a number of students who would simply stop going to school,” said Hairston. “Some students don't have a lot of positive things in their life, so having a safe supportive environment to look forward to after school is a huge deal. Some other students just need to know there is an adult in the building they can connect with if they are having a rough day.”
For more information about the SchoolsPlus program, visit the website
 

 

 


SchoolsPlus serves students, families

02 Apr 2015

http://thechronicleherald.ca/community/south-shore/1211150-schoolsplus-serves-students-families#.VRyKpFIhTqY.mailto

The Youth Advisory Committee includes student members of the group, along with Shirley Burris, SchoolsPlus Facilitator. Contributed
Since 2008 South Shore SchoolsPlus has operated in the South Shore Regional School Board. Originally started as a pilot program in the Chester area, South Shore SchoolsPlus has expanded to serve all Queens County schools, the New Germany family of schools, Bridgewater town schools, and continues with the Chester area family of schools.
South Shore SchoolsPlus facilitates the delivery of services to students and families in their local school. These include mental health, addictions, public health and justice services and programs through partnerships with these government agencies along with other community groups. The team works to break down barriers to access to programs and services for students and their families.
Currently South Shore SchoolsPlus operates over 40 youth, community and school-developed programs. These programs respond to needs identified by youth, families and communities. They often are developed by the students themselves with the support of the South Shore SchoolsPlus team.
One such initiative is the Lunenburg County RCMP Youth Advisory Committee (YAC), a group of 31 students from middle level and high schools who come together with members of the South Shore SchoolsPlus team to address issues such as bullying, sexual assault and substance abuse.
The YAC demonstrates individual and team leadership with their creation of public service announcements and videos addressing cyberbullying, bullying, sexting and drug awareness. Not a group to shy away from difficult topics, the YAC has presented to parent and community groups, designed posters for awareness campaigns and encouraged ongoing conversations in their schools.
The YAC recently received a group Lieutenant Governor’s Respectful Citizenship award for their positive contributions to their school communities. Award recipients are recognized for their respectful and responsible relationships and their work to create a safe and inclusive environment.
South Shore SchoolsPlus Outreach Workers are in schools daily, assisting students and families to succeed in school, as families and within the community. Work done by the South Shore SchoolsPlus team is multi-faceted but all comes together to help students and families with various supports and services.


Awards Celebrate Community-minded Seniors, Intergenerational Champions

24 Feb 2015

Voices - Booster Sessions

22 Jan 2015

VOICES is a Program of Self Discovery and Empowerment for girls. VOICES was created by Stephanie S. Covington,  to address the unique needs of adolescent girls and young women. It encourages them to seek and celebrate their “true selves” by providing a safe space, encouragement, structure, and the support they need to embrace their important journeys of self-discovery. The program advocates a strength based approach that helps girls to identify and apply their power and VOICES as individuals and as a group. The focus is on issues that are important in the lives of adolescent girls, from modules aboutThe journey ahead.
This program was offered to several grade 7 & 8 students at Annapolis Royal Regional Academy (ARRA) before Christmas Break 2014. The VOICES program held at ARRA was offered in partnership with Juniper House and was Proudly Sponsored by the Annapolis Community Health Board, Wellness Initiative Fund (WIF) Grant.
SchoolsPlus Annapolis will be hosting BOOSTER sessions to this group of grade 7 & 8 students at Annapolis West Education Centre (AWEC) that will include the Be*YOU*ty Revolution Self Love Workshops being Co-facilitated by Melissa Kelly, Raven Dawn Photography, Lori Andrews, Juniper House and Leah Marshall, SchoolsPlus Annapolis.
Melissa Kelly of Raven Dawn Photography, Supports the Empowerment of young women and the young at heart to stand in their authentic potential and truly see their power and beauty. This workshop will consist of two – 2hr long sessions and each participant will work through a Be*YOU*ty Revolution Self Love Workbook as well, each participant will have a Be*YOU*ty photo taken, so they may see their own natural Be*YOU*ty!
 
 
 
If you have an opportunity, please check out Raven Dawn Photography at the links below;
Supporting Women Everywhere To Reclaim Their Beauty ~ "Because the only woman you should be comparing yourself too, is who you were yesterday" - Melissa Kelly
INFO@RAVENDAWNPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
WWW.RAVENDAWNPHOTOGRAPHY.COM
 


Community Programs $8,000 richer

19 Nov 2014

The Spectator's View: School-based social service plan makes sense

19 Nov 2014

Spreading the Word About Mental Illness

20 Oct 2014

To foster a culture of compassion’

02 Jul 2014

SchoolsPlus Serves Students, Families

04 Jun 2014

Schools Plus program expanding in Aylesford: Glavine

02 Jun 2014

Lancement officiel du programme ÉcolesPlus

29 May 2014

Mental Health First Aid Training for Youth

15 Apr 2014

Community Pancake breakfast fundraiser for student emergency fund

14 Apr 2014

Jonathan Riley
Kathy Thompson of the DRHS cafeteria helps Zach Robinson and Jeimie Robicheau of the SchoolsPlus student advisory committee as they prepare for a pancake breakfast fundraiser on Saturday, April 26.
People like pancakes.
That’s the idea behind a fundraiser at Digby Regional High School—the student advisory committee for the SchoolsPlus program in Digby County is holding a pancake breakfast fundraiser on Saturday, April 26.
The proceeds from the fundraiser will go the student emergency fund for students at all schools in Digby County.
The student emergency fund helps families and students who don’t have the money or coverage for things like prescriptions, dental care, eye examinations, gas money for appointments in Yarmouth or at the IWK Hospital in Halifax.
“A big part of the SchoolsPlus program is to fill in all those little gaps,” says Amy Theriault, a SchoolsPlus facilitator.
For example last year they helped more than 20 students in Digby County get eyeglasses.
Theriault and Carmelita Johnson, a SchoolsPlus community outreach worker, have asked teachers and principals to refer any students who might need some help.
For example, if a teacher noticed a student having trouble seeing the board, then SchoolsPlus could arrange an eye appointment.
“If you’re a student who can’t see the board, or you have a toothache, that is definitely going to affect your ability to learn,” said Theriault.
Theriault remembers one student who was having trouble seeing in class and they were able to get glasses for him.
“He then could be more productive with his school work,” she said. “In addition, he said that without his glasses, he wouldn’t have been able to write his driver’s test, which was very important for him because he wanted to look for employment and gain some independence.”
In other cases, they provided gas cards for parents who had to drive their children long distances to medical appointments, or paid for medication that some students needed to be able to focus in school.
The student emergency fund has received some funding from the community health board, plus donations from the Scotiabank and from concerned community members, but those funds have run out already for this year.
Theriault and Johnson hope the pancake breakfast will raise some money for the program, but also raise community awareness about the emergency fund—so people know the help is there if they need it; and so other people are aware of a way they can help.
The breakfast runs from 8 a.m. to 11 and costs $9 for adults and $4.50 for kids.
jriley@digbycourier.ca
 


SSRSB Students Receive Lieutenant Governor's Respectful Citizenship Award

14 Apr 2014

SSRSB Students Receive Lieutenant Governor's Respectful Citizenship Award
Details
Category: SSRSB News Releases
Written by Trish Smith
 Bridgewater, NS – South Shore students will be traveling to Halifax on Wednesday, February 26 to attend a ceremony at Government House and receive the Lieutenant Governor’s Respectful Citizenship award for their positive contributions to their school communities.
            Members of the Lunenburg County RCMP Youth Advisory Committee, with members from middle and senior high schools across the county, as well as Robyn Whynot of Liverpool Regional High School will be receiving the award.
            These awards recognize student leadership in their schools and communities, and dedication to creating safe and inclusive environments. Award recipients promote respectful and responsible relationships and do not accept bullying behaviour.
            The Lunenburg County RCMP Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) demonstrates individual and team leadership with their creation of public service announcements and videos addressing cyberbullying, bullying, sexting and drug awareness. Not a group to shy away from difficult topics, the YAC has presented to parent and community groups, designed posters for awareness campaigns and encouraged ongoing conversations in their schools. They continue to work as a united group within Lunenburg County with the support of the RCMP and SchoolsPlus.
            Robyn Whynot is president and co-chair of the Liverpool Regional High School Youth Advisory Council and devotes her time to helping youth in the area of accessing health services and on anti-bullying campaigns. As a member of the Respect, Empathy and Positivity Committee at LRHS, Robyn spoke in Ottawa on Hepatitis C the world-wide effects. Robyn is deeply connected with her Mi’Kmaw culture and believes that building respectful relationships is the key to preservation of a person’s culture.
            “We are very proud of the award recipients from the South Shore,” said Superintendent of Schools Geoff Cainen. “Amazing work is being done everyday in our schools to promote respectful behaviour, and these students are wonderful examples of the initiatives being taken to develop safe and inclusive schools.”
            The awards will be presented by His Honour Brigadier-General The Honourable J.J. Grant, CMM, ONS, CD (Ret’d) Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia.
           
-30-
For more information, contact:
Trish Smith
Tel. 902-541-3005
Cell. 902-523-1664
Email.  tsmith@ssrsb.ca
 


Community Crime Prevention and Reduction Grants Awarded

14 Apr 2014

Community Crime Prevention and Reduction Grants Awarded
Department of Justice
April 8, 2014 11:45 AM

NOTE: A list of the 36, 2014 One-time Community Crime Prevention and Reduction Investment Program recipients is available at http://novascotia.ca/just/prevention/grants.asp .

A recreation program that provides youth with a chance to learn new skills is one of 36 organizations receiving crime prevention funding.

Government today, April 8, announced the recipients of the One-time Community Crime Prevention and Reduction Investment Grants. The grants fund community activities, projects and programs that address root causes of crime.

"We're all impacted by crime in our communities, and we all need to work together to create solutions," said Justice Minister Lena Diab. "To encourage this, we asked groups to collaborate on projects that support crime prevention and strengthen relationships in their communities. We believe building positive relationships is the foundation of a vibrant and safe community."

Many of the projects are activities for youth that create stronger connections with communities. The Art Of ... program is a collaboration between youth agencies in the Amherst area that helps youth and adults build positive relationships. The young participants also learn leisure skills to fill their time with constructive activities.

"The Art Of ... gives youth something to do and a place to go once a week during the school year," said Jennifer Furlong, executive director at the Cumberland Restorative Justice Society. "This grant will help us buy some higher-cost items, such as guitars, supplies for fibre arts and GPS units to expand the variety of programs offered. These are things the youth have asked for, but until now, we have not been able to afford."

The One-time Community Crime Prevention and Reduction Investment Grant Program awards $40,000 annually. Nova Scotians were eligible to apply for grants of $1,000 to $5,000.

 


The art of the funding grant

14 Apr 2014

·       11 Apr 2014
·       The Amherst News
·       BY MITCHELL PETERS AMHERST NEWS

The art of the funding grant
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The Art of... receives grant from Community Crime Prevention
Members of the Art of... group engage in extra-curricular activities. The volunteer group has received funding from the provincial Community Crime Prevention and Reduction organization. AMHERST – The Art of... is an Amherst youth committee that has been preventing and reducing crime in a unique way for just over two years now.
MITCHELL PETERS  AMHERST NEWS
The volunteer group, run by community members, has received a one-time grant from Community Crime Prevention and Reduction for collaborating with community partners and offering a place to go, something to do and creating a positive learning environment for youth.
The Art of... is a recreational program that provides kids from Grades 7 to 12 with a chance to learn new skills, and is one of 36 organizations that will be receiving funding.
To be an eligible contestant this year, the program had to be collaborating with other programs for community safety, said Jennifer Furlong, executive director at the Cumberland Restorative Justice Society. The Art of... was created in a meeting at the Cumberland Kids 12-19 committee.
The grant will offer money to this program, which has been run the past two years on no budget, relying on donations and volunteers.
With the money, Furlong is hoping to invest into equipment for the youth. The Art of... focuses on building different skills every month and these skills are suggested by the participants and include web design, cooking, scrapbooking, yoga, journalling, knitting, winter outdoor sports, cupcake decorating, archery, playing guitar, rug hooking, photography, skateboarding, felting, and disc golf. The program is also hoping to provide Geo-caching as a future activity.
The group runs during the school year and meets weekly.
“Art of... has been going on for over two years now and is a pretty regular group. It’s about introducing kids to new skills,” said Furlong.
The Art of... is in affiliation with representatives from Cumberland Restorative Justice, Parenting Journey, Maggie’s Place, Cumberland YMCA, Town of Amherst, Municipality of Cumberland, Amherst Police Department, Sexual Health Centre of Cumberland County, Public Health, Autumn House, Cumberland Addictions and Mental Health, and Schools Plus.


NS CAYS - Shining the Light on Promising Practices - 2013 Provincial Symposium

02 Dec 2013

SchoolsPlus Evaluation - Year 3

15 Oct 2013

Deux animatrices et trois intervenantes au programme ÉcolesPlus

03 Oct 2013

Le programme ÉcolesPlus dans les ècoles du CSAP

01 Oct 2013

African Nova Scotians celebrate learning

30 Sep 2013

African Nova Scotians celebrate learning
 
Jonathan Riley
Published on August 27, 2013
 
African Nova Scotians celebrated education and the potential of their children at a special ceremony at Digby Regional High School.
 
Parents and children, friends and family filled the cafeteria on Friday, Aug. 16 to recognize the hard work and dedication of two dozen students who spent four weeks at the Quest for Knowledge summer camp or who had participated in the cultural and academic enrichement program during the 2012/ 2013 school year.
 
Quest for Knowledge is aimed at students in grade and six but older children also take part as mentors and as activity leaders.
 
The enrichment program is open to all African Nova Scotian learners from primary to grade 12 and runs from October to May.
 
Ke’Shwan Miller says the camp was a fun experience – he really enjoyed all the sports.
 
But that’s not why he came to the camp.
 
He wanted to attend the summer camp to improve his reading.
 
He read a detailed and poignant speech at the closing ceremonies about his struggles in the classroom and showed just how good his reading had become.
 
“One time I was reading to my teacher and I had trouble and she made a weird face,” he read to the audience. “I was mad and sad that I couldn’t get some of the words.”
 
The ceremony included several other student speeches and singing including the camp song:
  Quest for Knowledge, Quest for Knowledge,
    First comes high school, then comes college.
  Quest for Knowledge has taught me a thing or two,
    Math, language arts and day trips too.
 
Brenda Clarke, regional educator with the Black Educators Association says it is wonderful to see all the children together from all the different communities.
 
“We always say if all they had to do was learn, how they’d blossom,” said Clarke. “Here they don’t have to worry about looking different or being the only one in their class.”
 
Ben Elms, whose full-time job is principal at DRHS, volunteers with Quest for Knowledge in the summer months.
 
He said it was neat to spend time with the younger students.
 
“They have such potential,” he told the parents at the closing ceremony. “You have a  remarkable, talented, promising group of young people here.”
 
Daija Miller participated in the enrichment program and took part in a special camp last spring to prepare her to be one of the young mentors at the summer camp.
 
“The camp has helped me realize I can do anything if I just put my heart into it,” she said.
 
 
jriley@digbycourier.ca


Into the Studio,

27 Aug 2013

The CD recorded by participants in the music camp. Entitled ‘2 Kewl 4 Skool, it features four cover tracks, each performed by two of (cover, back row, from left) Jonathan Rector, Jamie Gould, Amy Cole, Alex Aresenault-Seaman, Vanessa Smith (front row), Abbey Letcher, Tenique Ross and Tatyanna Van de Wiel. Eric Sparling – Amherst Daily News
 
Music camp
 
Into the studio
 
Youngsters record four songs in Moncton
By Eric Sparling
 
Amherst Daily News
 
AMHERST – Eight Amherst kids got a chance to record some tracks in a Moncton studio, thanks to a music and voice lessons camp organized by Amherst Schools Plus.
 
“We made a CD,” said Kim Wood, facilitator for Schools Plus, a program that draws on multiple agencies to provide educational opportunities for kids who need alternatives to just traditional schooling.
 
Thanks to Wood and her colleague Marvin Hairston, and especially voice coach Vanessa Chaisson – she volunteered her time, and arranged the studio through Long and McQuade – the students attended music camp July 2 to 5 at ARHS, and traveled up to Moncton where pairs of singers recorded covers of four songs.
 
Two of the eight children were not Schools Plus students, but had a demonstrated interest in music and singing through their involvement in a musical at Spring Street Academy. Students from E.B. Chandler and ARHS were also included in the eight.
 
Schools Plus serves six schools, but all the students were from town. Wood acknowledged transportation may have been an issue, although a student who has moved to Oxford was able to participate.
Would-be participants didn’t need to have Canadian Idol ambitions.
 
“Not necessarily an interest in professional (singing),” said Wood, describing the students.
 
But even if a career in front of a microphone isn’t the outcome, the facilitator said the camp was an opportunity to build self-esteem and confidence.
 
She said they received positive feedback from parents, and the kids arrived on time and were engaged by the activity.
 
Last year Schools Plus used grant money to take students on a trip to PEI. This year, they didn’t have grant money, but were still able to find funding for the camp.
 
“It was actually using some of our deferral money from Schools Plus,” she said.
 
The kids will have a souvenir from the experience: each has a CD containing the four tracks they recorded.
 
The idea of holding a camp was inspired by a Youth Art Connection-organized trip to Amherst by Liberian-born rapper Konyon Ca$H, who performed at the Cumberland YMCA.
 
eric.sparling@tc.tc
On Twitter: @ADNsparling


McCain Foundation Helps Fund Early Years Centres

22 Aug 2013

PREMIER'S OFFICE--McCain Foundation Helps Fund Early Years Centres
-----------------------------------------------------------------
The province is partnering with the Margaret and Wallace McCain Family Foundation to better support the early growth and development of children by providing improved access to more resources for young families.
 
Margaret McCain today, July 10, announced the foundation will provide a $500,000 grant to help establish the province's first early years centres in three communities across the province. Premier Darrell Dexter and Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Ramona Jennex joined Ms. McCain at the Halifax Developmental Centre for Early Learning to welcome the news.
 
"It's important for families of young children to have a place to go when they have questions and need support," said Premier Dexter. "These early years centres will ensure parents have access to all the supports they need in one place.
 
"I want to thank Margaret McCain and the foundation for working with the province on this important initiative. Today's children are the future of Nova Scotia, and together we can make sure that they get the best possible start in life."
 
The early years centres will provide a variety of resources based on a community's needs, including early learning programs, regulated child care, before- and after-school programs, parent education and early intervention.
 
Under its Early Childhood Centre Initiative, the Margaret and Wallace McCain Family Foundation will provide $100,000 a year, for the next five years, to help establish the centres.
 
"We are pleased to partner with the government of Nova Scotia as it creates the first tier of life-long learning," said Ms. McCain. "The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development has the important task of turning a service patchwork into a comprehensive system for young children and their families, while keeping a link to a powerful asset, public education."
 
In April, the province announced it would create early years centres across the province to provide support for young children and their families at accessible locations in the community. The centres will build on the highly successful SchoolsPlus model and will help bring seamless access to regulated child care, early learning programs, early intervention and parent education.
 
"I am very thankful for the support of the Margaret and Wallace McCain Family Foundation," said Ms. Jennex. "The first six years of a child's life are vitally important to development, so it's crucial that families have access to the best care and programs needed for their child. The early years centres will build on the success of current resources and help create a well-integrated system."
 
The first three locations will be determined in the coming months.
 
Also announced today was the Provincial Early Years Partnership, a committee of government and non-government representatives from child care, education and health with a shared focus on early childhood development. The committee will work with the new Early Years Branch as it charts a quality system for early childhood development in Nova Scotia.
 
"I'm excited to be working with the Early Years Branch," said Gerard Kysela, board vice-chair of the Early Intervention Association of Nova Scotia. "Integration of services for children, from before birth to age 6, and their families, is important to optimize the developmental outcome for young children, and provide strong supports for families and communities."
 
Earlier this year, the province expanded the Department of Education to include an early years branch, creating the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. It will develop a comprehensive plan for checkups with families when a child is 18 months old and again at 36 months. The visits are designed to identify a child's needs early, to ensure supports are in place when the child starts school.
 
All of these steps are based on feedback in response to the Early Years discussion paper released in May. More than 1,000 Nova Scotians attended focus groups and interested groups sessions and provided written submissions on how to improve supports for children and families.
 


MAKING A MARK: Self-esteem camp captures some students this summer

22 Aug 2013

 

 

 
 

MAKING A MARK: Self-esteem camp captures some students this summer

July 31, 2013 - 10:28am By FRANCES WILLICK | MAKING A MARK

 

 

 

 

 
 
Some kids in Digby County are spending part of their summer in school — and they’re glad to be there.
Digby Regional High School has already held one camp and is hosting a second to help to prepare students for the coming school year while offering some summer fun at the same time.
Girls aged 12 to 15 gathered at the No Fears No Limits camp earlier this month to talk and learn about anxiety and how to build confidence and self-esteem.
The camp, organized by SchoolsPlus, in partnership with the Digby Clare Mental Health Volunteers Association, brought in a psychologist, recreation therapist and youth leader to help the 15 girls connect with each other and with services that can help them.
Youth leader Taima Urquhart, 18, said there’s definitely a need for the camp in Digby County to address issues such as body image, self-worth, self-harm, sexual messages in the media, pregnancy, peer pressure and cyberbullying.
“There are young girls who are going into high school or are in high school already and they’re facing all sorts of new problems and they aren’t given the tools to cope with them,” she said. “So camps like this help those who are less able to cope get the tools and the empowerment to be able to do it.”
This was the first year for the No Fears No Limits camp, but organizers hope to see its return next summer.
Another group of kids in the region will spend four weeks at the Quest for Knowledge camp, which focuses on skills such as literacy and numeracy and incorporates Africentric themes and activities.
Ben Elms, the principal of Digby Regional High School, where the camp takes place, said the free camp helps the kids get ready for the return to school in September.
“Their level of preparedness and ability to come in and get started in the fall is enhanced by having had the experience in the summer,” he said. “You would think they wouldn’t want to be doing this kind of thing in the summer, but they’re beating down our doors to get in.”
But it’s not all calculators and textbooks.
The 20 students in grades 5 and 6 will also go on outings to explore their area, including a whale-watching trip and a visit to the tidal power plant.
“It gets them out from playing with computer games ... and sitting in their basements on computers,” Elms said. “(It) gets them interactive and doing some neat things.”
 


Student Access to Services, After School Programs Expands

19 Jun 2013

EDUCATION/EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT--Student Access to Services, After School Programs Expands
----------------------------------------------------------------
An expanding initiative will help hundreds more students and families access health services, learning resources and after-school programs.
 
Students and staff at Hillside Park Elementary School in Lower Sackville joined Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Ramona Jennex today, June 19, to announce six new sites  for the SchoolsPlus program. SchoolsPlus helps students receive the supports they need to thrive in school. One of the new sites will be in the Sackville High family of schools.
 
"SchoolsPlus is a successful model that helps students, families and communities get a full range of support services in the heart of their communities, their schools," said Ms. Jennex. "Through SchoolsPlus, students have access to mental health clinicians in schools, homework clubs and mentoring, and after school programs that weren't available before."
 
Every school is different, but those in SchoolsPlus work together to co-ordinate and deliver more than a hundred services and activities across the province.
 
"I feel like we are finally heading in the right direction in working towards closing the gap between home, school and services," said Lori Andrews, parent and outreach worker with Juniper House in Digby. "SchoolsPlus provides for the real needs of students and families. I experienced this first-hand when my daughter was experiencing difficulties at school and SchoolsPlus provided a safe space as well as support."  
 
The External Review of the Halifax Regional School Board's Support of Rehtaeh Parsons and the province's Speak Up Action Plan To Address Bullying and Cyberbullying Behaviour both recommended SchoolsPlus be expanded. The province continues to establish new SchoolsPlus sites each year.  
 
SchoolsPlus, part of the Kids and Learning First plan, encourages collaboration between government, school boards and agencies to ensure students have a place to go for help, in a familiar environment.
 
It brings a range of mental health services and other health programs together with mentoring, homework support, social work, and justice services into schools where children, youth and families can easily access them.
 
The other SchoolsPlus sites approved for 2013-14 are:
-- Annapolis Valley Regional School Board, with a hub site at Windsor Elementary School, serving the West Hants family of schools.
-- Tri-County Regional School Board, with a hub site at Barrington Municipal High School, serving its feeder schools with possible expansion in Shelburne County.
-- Strait Regional School Board, with a hub site at St. Andrew Junior High School, serving five other schools.
-- Conseil scolaire acadien provincial, with completion of hub sites in the southwest and northeast regions of the board.
The new and expanded sites will open in the fall.
 
"We are thrilled that the SchoolsPlus program is coming to Sackville," said Karla Wolfe, principal of Hillside Park Elementary School. "SchoolsPlus will provide more opportunities for support and involvement, and address gaps that sometimes exist when trying to connect families with the appropriate services and support."
 
Two more SchoolsPlus sites have been approved for 2014-15 in:
-- Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board, with a hub site at Glace Bay High School, supporting six more schools
-- Chignecto Central Regional School Board, with a hub site at New Glasgow Junior High, supporting four schools.
 
Boards will be invited to make submissions for expansion in the spring of 2014.
 
SchoolsPlus sites serve more than 135 schools and are available in all eight school boards. For more information, visit http://schoolsplus.ednet.ns.ca .
 
----------------------------------------------------------------FOR BROADCAST USE:
 
     The SchoolsPlus program is being expanded to help hundreds
 
more students and families access health services, learning
 
resources and after-school programs.
 
     Students and staff at Hillside Park Elementary School in
 
Lower Sackville joined Education and Early Childhood Development
 
Minister Ramona Jennex today (June 19th), to announce six new
 
sites for the SchoolsPlus program.
 
     Ms. Jennex says SchoolsPlus is a successful model that
 
Helps students, families and communities access to mental health
 
clinicians in schools, homework clubs and mentoring, and after
 
school programs that weren't available before.
 
     Besides the Sackville High family of schools, the other
 
SchoolsPlus sites approved for 2013-2014 are Windsor Elementary
 
Barrington Municipal High and St. Andrew Junior High schools as
 
well as the completion of hub sites in the southwest and
 
northeast regions of the Conseil scolaire acadien provincial.
 
The new and expanded sites will open in the fall.
 
     Glace Bay High and New Glasgow Junior High have been
 
approved for 2014-2015.
 
-30-
 
Media Contact: Michelle Lucas
               902-424-8307
               Cell: 902-222-1784
               E-mail: lucasml@gov.ns.ca
 
**end of message**


Leaders of Today - Annapolis Valley

16 Apr 2013

Province Will Provide Improved Service to Young Children, Families

10 Apr 2013

PREMIER'S OFFICE--Province Will Provide Improved Service to Young Children, Families
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Nova Scotia's families will receive more co-ordinated and accessible support in the earliest years of their children's lives.
 
The province announced in the Speech from the Throne today, March 26, its renewed focus on children and youth, most notably the creation of the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.
 
"Our children deserve the best possible start in life to help them develop to their full potential," said Premier Darrell Dexter. "We asked Nova Scotians how to improve our approach to the early years, and we are responding with a plan that will make it easier for families to receive the help and services they need."
 
The department will bring together dedicated staff from Education, Community Services, and Health and Wellness who oversee more than 200 programs and services such as child care and early intervention. The new Early Years branch will improve the way the province supports children and their families in the first years of life.
 
In this session of the legislature, Ramona Jennex, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development, will outline immediate actions and multi-year goals to help Nova Scotia make the most of the early years.
 
The plan is based on advice and ideas received across the province during consultations, as well as the recommendations of the Early Years Advisory Council.
 
It builds on the success of SchoolsPlus, a program that provides social services, health services, mentoring, and parenting workshops for students and families, now available in 98 schools.
 
Anne McGuire, co-chair of the Early Years Advisory Council, welcomed the increased focus on early childhood development within the new department.
 
"The announcement of this new department is wonderful news," said Ms. McGuire, CEO of the IWK Health Centre. "This integration of programs within one department will enable increased focus on providing quality supports for families and children in the very important early years of life."
 
Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant today highlighted several other government programs that are putting children first.
 
-- Through Thrive!, the province is investing in recreational facilities and expanding provincial support for community use of schools by recreational, sports and other volunteer groups.
-- Annapolis Valley/Glooscap, Eskasoni, Millbrook, Membertou and Paqtnkek will hire full-time staff to develop and implement physical activity plans.
-- Starting this fall, the Mathematics 10 course will be year-long to provide more learning time.
-- Succeeding in Reading is helping more of Nova Scotia's youngest students learn to read. More than 3,800 children got help last year. With this year's extension of the program into Grade 3, even more children will benefit.
 


A Lesson in Mental Health for Educators

14 Mar 2013

Students Receiving More Support Through SchoolsPlus

07 Mar 2013

EDUCATION--Students Receiving More Support Through SchoolsPlus
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Students and families in Yarmouth, Antigonish and Richmond counties have more access to services and after-school programs through SchoolsPlus.
 
Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau, on behalf of Education Minister Ramona Jennex, joined students and staff to officially open SchoolsPlus sites at Ecole secondaire de Par-en-Bas in Tusket, Ecole acadienne de Pomquet, and Ecole Beau-Port in Arichat today, March 4.
 
"Schools are at the heart of their communities, and SchoolsPlus programs and services help students, families and communities get a full range of support in a comfortable and familiar location," said Mr. Belliveau.
 
Part of the Kids and Learning First plan, SchoolsPlus brings services like mentoring, homework support and health programs right into schools where kids and families can easily access them. The Par-en-Bas site will begin offering the Incredible Years parenting course this week. 
 
Natasha Fitzgerald, a Grade 10 student at Ecole secondaire de Par-en-Bas, said she has felt more engaged at school since taking part in SchoolsPlus programs.
 
"SchoolsPlus has helped me to be me," said Natasha. "I come to school and I know that it's going to be fun."
 
The province has also committed to hiring mental health clinicians to work alongside guidance counsellors in SchoolsPlus schools. A part-time clinician is now available to students at Pomquet and Beau-Port.
 
SchoolsPlus is available in 95 schools across the province and will expand further in 2013-14. For more information, visit schoolsplus.ednet.ns.ca .
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 
FOR BROADCAST USE:
 
      Students and families in Yarmouth, Antigonish and Richmond
 
counties have more access to services and after-school programs
 
through SchoolsPlus.
 
     Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau, on behalf of
 
Education Minister Ramona Jennex, helped officially open
 
SchoolsPlus sites today (March 4th) at Ecole secondaire de
 
Par-en-Bas in Tusket, Ecole acadienne de Pomquet, and Ecole
 
Beau-Port in Arichat.
 
     Mr. Belliveau says SchoolsPlus helps students and families
 
receive a full range of services in a familiar and comfortable
 
location.
 
     SchoolsPlus, which is part of the Kids and Learning First
 
plan, brings services like mentoring, homework support and
 
parenting workshops directly into schools.
 
     The province has also committed to hiring mental health
 
clinicians in SchoolsPlus schools. A part-time clinician is now
 
available to students at Pomquet and Beau-Port.
 
-30-
 
Media Contact: Chad Lucas
               Department of Education
               902-424-8307
               Cell: 902-478-7302
               E-mail: lucascga@gov.ns.ca


Adult High School - Chester District Elementary SchoolsPlus Area

07 Mar 2013

EDUCATION--Training Helps Identify Mental Health Problems in Schools
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Students often turn to teachers, guidance counsellors, school psychologists or social workers for help when dealing with social and emotional issues at school.
 
Training school staff to identify mental health problems will help connect students to the supports they need.
 
"Young people with mental illness are more likely to be victims, not perpetrators, of violence," said Dr. Stan Kutcher, Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health, Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre, and director World Health Organization Collaborating Centre, Dalhousie University.
 
"Early identification, as well as social and educational support, can substantially improve outcomes. Therefore, it's important for the school staff that students naturally go to for help to be able to identify the signs of mental health problems."
 
As part of Speak Up, the government's action plan to address bullying and cyberbullying behaviour, the province is working with Dr. Kutcher to provide his Go-To training program for educators to learn how to recognize mental health issues.
 
Go-To educators can identify students with a high likelihood of having a mental disorder, link the student to appropriate supports, and provide on-going help. While they do not diagnose students, Go-To educators are a link to health and mental health providers and be a contact for parents.
 
About 65 guidance counsellors, school psychologists, mental health clinicians, SchoolsPlus staff, and social workers will be trained as Go-To educators. Using a train-the-trainer model, participants will teach others in schools across the province. The goal is to have about five trainers in each school board with about two Go-To educators in every school.
 
"Students come to us with lots of problems and our ability to identify the root cause quickly, be it a mental health issue or perhaps bullying, can ensure they get the support they need," said Delores Boudreau, guidance counsellor, Conseil scolaire acadien provincial. "I look forward to taking this learning back to my board. It will certainly build greater capacity in our schools to help students facing mental health issues."
 
Speak Up outlines more than 40 actions to support a community-wide response involving families, schools, teachers, communities, police, health-care providers and several government departments.
 
For more information on the province's Speak Up action plan, visit www.ednet.ns.ca .
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------
FOR BROADCAST USE:
 
     As part of Speak Up, the government's action plan to address
 
bullying and cyberbullying behaviour, the province is working
 
with Dr. Stan Kutcher, the Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent
 
Mental Health for Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre
 
to provide Go-To training for educators to learn how to recognize
 
mental health issues in schools.
 
     Dr. Kutcher says it's important for school staff students
 
go to for help to be able to identify the signs of mental health
 
problems.
 
     School staff trained to identify mental health problems can
 
help connect students quickly with the supports they need.
 
-30-
 
Media Contacts: Chad Lucas
                Department of Education
                902-424-8307
                Cell: 902-478-7302
                E-mail: lucascga@gov.ns.ca
 
                Faten Alshazly
                Sun Life Financial Adolescent Mental Health Chair Dalhousie University/IWK Health Centre
                902-470-6582
                E-mail: Faten.Alshazly@iwk.nshealth.ca


Information Sharing Quick Reference Guide

07 Feb 2013

Information Sharing
Quick Reference Guide

This document provides guidance for SchoolsPlus staff and departmental and agency partners, to allow them to make decisions on how and when to share information about children, youth, adults, and families.

Integrated Service Delivery under the SchoolsPlus Program, using authorized and effective information sharing, provides the best treatment for youth at risk.

There are two major pieces of privacy legislation in Nova Scotia, the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and Personal Health Information Act. There may be other applicable legislation Youth Criminal Justice Act, Children and Family Services Act
and policies pursuant to those laws.

Green Light

Generally speaking, pursuant to the Information and Protection of Privacy Act Health Information Act, personal information and personal health information under the following circumstances:

with written consent OR
to avert or minimize imminent danger to the health or safety of the youth or other person(s), OR

to report a youth who might need intervention under the Children and Family Services Act, or

by order of the Court

Generally speaking, pursuant to the Personal Health Information Act, personal health inforamtion can also be shared by a "custodian" (as defined by the Act) to a "custodian" involved in the individual's health care, if the disclosure is reaonsably necessary for the provision of health care to the individual, and the individual's consent to disclose the information has not been revoked or withdrawn.

Yellow Light

In the following circumstances, obtain more information and/or get advice from a supervisor, consultant, or lawyer:

when consent is not provided or refused, but when there may be a health or safety issue for an individual or groups, or

to report criminal activity to police, or

when ther is a demand or request to produce information for a legal proceeding,

when a professional code of ethics may be perceived to limit disclosure

Red Light

Information can never be shared if there is

a legislative requirement barring disclosure, or

no consent and no need to know, nor overriding health/safety concerns, or

consent but no need to know, nor overriding health/safety concerns

Resources

Nova Scotia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and Personal Health Information Act
http://nslegislature.ca/legc/~office.htm

Youth Criminal Justice Act
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/index.html

For more information, contact:

Tara Moore, SchoolsPlus Coordinator
Student Services, Department of Education
2021 Brunswick Street
Halifax, NS
B3K 2Y5
Phone: 902-424-7308 Email: MooreTL@gov.ns.ca

Source: This Quick Reference Guide was adapted from “Information Sharing for Human Service Providers in the Alberta Public Sector” (Province of Alberta 2008).


Guide de consultation rapide sur l’échange d’informations

07 Feb 2013

Guide de consultation rapide
sur l’échange d’informations

Fonction

Ce document fournit des conseils au personnel ÉcolesPlus et aux ministères et agences partenaires d’ÉcolesPlus afin de leur
permettre de prendre des décisions concernant les échanges d’informations sur les enfants, les jeunes, les adultes et les familles,
la forme que ces échanges doivent prendre et les moments où ces échanges sont appropriés.

Vision

C’est l’offre de services intégrés dans le cadre du programme ÉcolesPlus, qui s’appuie sur des échanges autorisés et utiles
d’informations, qui assure le meilleur traitement possible pour les jeunes à risque.

Textes de loi

Il y a deux principaux textes de loi se rapportant à la vie privée en Nouvelle-Écosse, la loi sur l’accès aux informations et la
protection de la vie privée (
(
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act) et la loi sur les renseignements médicaux personnelsPersonal Health Information Act). Il peut y avoir d’autres textes de loi (la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents, la
Loi sur l’éducation
vertu de ces textes de loi qui s’appliquent.
, la loi sur les services à l’enfance et à la famille [Children and Family Services Act], etc.) et politiques établies en
Feu vert

En règle générale, selon la loi sur l’accès aux informations et
la protection de la vie privée et la loi sur les renseignements
médicaux personnels,
renseignements personnels et des renseignements médicaux
dans les circonstances suivantes :
il est possible d’échanger des

soit avec le consentement écrit des personnes concernées;

santé ou la sécurité du jeune ou d’autres personnes;
soit pour éviter ou minimiser un danger imminent pour la

d’une intervention selon la loi sur les services à l’enfance et à
la famille;
soit pour signaler le cas d’un jeune qui pourrait avoir besoin

En règle générale, selon la loi sur les renseignements médicaux
personnels,
renseignements médicaux personnels entre une « personne
ayant la garde de l’enfant » (selon la définition de la loi) et une
« personne ayant la charge de l’enfant » qui participe à l’offre
de soins de santé à l’individu, du moment qu’il est raisonnable
d’exiger la communication des renseignements dans le cadre
de l’offre des soins de santé à l’individu et que le consentement
de l’individu à la divulgation de ces renseignements n’a pas été
révoqué ou retiré.
soit sur ordre du tribunal.il est également possible d’échanger les
Feu orange

Dans les circonstances suivantes, veuillez obtenir des
informations supplémentaires ou des conseils auprès de votre
supérieur hiérarchique, d’un conseiller ou d’un avocat :


consentement, mais qu’il peut y avoir un problème de santé
ou de sécurité pour un individu ou un groupe;
soit quand l’individu n’a pas accordé ou a refusé son

soit pour signaler une activité criminelle à la police;

demandent la présentation de renseignements;
soit lorsqu’il y a des démarches judiciaires qui exigent ou

soit restreinte par le code de déontologie d’une profession.
soit lorsqu’il semble que la divulgation des renseignements
Feu rouge

Il est interdit d’échanger
les renseignements dans les cas suivants :

des renseignements;
soit il existe une disposition juridique interdisant la divulgation

nécessaire de connaitre ces renseignements et il n’y a pas
d’inquiétude sur le plan de la santé ou de la sécurité qui justifie
d’outrepasser l’interdiction;
soit l’individu n’a pas accordé son consentement, il n’est pas

nécessaire de connaitre ces renseignements et il n’y a pas
d’inquiétude sur le plan de la santé ou de la sécurité qui justifie
d’outrepasser l’interdiction.
soit l’individu a accordé son consentement, mais il n’est pas
Ressources

Loi sur l’accès aux informations et la protection de la vie
privée (
de la Nouvelle-Écosse
http://nslegislature.ca/legc/~office.htm
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act)
Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents

http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/fra/index.html

Pour de plus amples renseignements :

Tara Moore, coordonnatrice ÉcolesPlus
Division des services aux élèves, Ministère de l’Éducation
2021, rue Brunswick
Halifax (N.-É.) B3K 2Y5
Tél. : 902-424-7308 Courriel : MooreTL@gov.ns.ca

Source : Ce guide de consultation rapide sur l’échange d’informations est tiré du document « Information
Sharing for Human Service Providers in the Alberta Public Sector » (2008) de la province de l’Alberta. 15


Adult High School - Chester District Elementary SchoolsPlus Area

28 Jan 2013

Open Gym at DRHS

28 Jan 2013

Babysitter Training Course - Registration Form

28 Jan 2013

Canada Safety Council

Babysitter Training
Course
        Sponsored by South Shore SchoolsPlus
 
 

 

 
REGISTRATION
Please complete & return by January 31st, 2013
 
 
Afterschool:          February 7, 14, 21, 28 March 7, 2013
                               3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Full day session:  On Saturday Date to be announced, 
                                        9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Including Graduation)
 
 
Student’s Full Name: ___________________________________________________
 
Student’s Age:      _______________             Student’s Grade:  ________________
 
Mailing Address:  ______________________________________________________
 
                              _____________________________________________________
 
Home Phone:           _____________________________________________________
 
Name of Parent/Guardian: ______________________________________________
 
Phone Number of Parent/Guardian: Home ___________ Work: _______________
 
I give my permission for ___________________________ to participate in the CSC Babysitting course offered at Wickwire Academy. I understand if my daughter/son misses a session they will be unable to become certified. I agree to make arrangements for my child to be picked up at the school at 5:00 p.m. on the days of the program.
Signature of Parent/Guardian: __________________________________________
Date: ________________________________________________________________


Babysitter Training Course

28 Jan 2013

 

 

Canada Safety Council
Babysitter Training
Course
        Sponsored by South Shore SchoolsPlus

 
 
 
FREE!!
 
What Every Babysitter Should Know
 
Open to Girls and Boys, 12 years old and up
 
This program is being offered to
Wickwire Academy students
Only 15 seats available, don’t miss out
 
 
Afterschool:          February 7, 14, 21, 28 March 7, 2013
                               3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Full day session:  On Saturday Date to be announced, 
                                        9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Including Graduation)
The Babysitters’ Training Course is loaded with special features such as:

  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Child Development & Behavioral Problems
  • Caring for the Child & Nutrition
  • Safety and Basic First Aid
  • Handling Emergencies
  • The Sick Child
  • Games and Play Activities
  • Children with Special Needs
  • Advice for Parents

 

 

 
 

For More Information contact:
Bridgett Morgan, D.E.C., B.A., R.S.W., B.S.W.
Outreach Worker, South Shore SchoolsPlus
E-mail: bmorgan@ssrsb.ca
Phone: 902-350-0012


Restorative justice program expanding to adults

18 Dec 2012

Restorative justice program expanding to adults
Volunteers needed to work with those in conflict with the law
by Lisa Brown

BRIDGEWATER — A new program has an agency that deals with people in conflict with the law looking for new volunteers.
The South Shore Community Justice Society will expand the scope of its operations in the new year.
For a decade, the organization has assisted young people, their victims and the community come to terms with offences. Now, that restorative justice approach is broadening to include adults.
A pilot project is currently wrapping up in Cape Breton and Truro. Officials expect the program will begin in Lunenburg County by January.
The current adult diversion program will be replaced and expanded. Adult restorative justice will be administered through Correctional Services.
“If there’s a victim, they send it over to us, because we have the expertise of dealing with victims where they don’t,” explains Susan Himmelman, co-ordinator of South Shore Community Justice.
She estimates the local office will handle up to 100 adult files a year. That’s on top of the approximately 70 youth files they deal with annually.
Since it started here in 2002, South Shore Community Justice has worked with more than 1,300 youth. About 85 per cent successfully completed their restorative justice agreements.
That included performing more than 9,700 hours of community service, paying nearly $53,000 in restitution, about 225 donations to local charities and more than 500 referrals for personal development, such things as counselling for anger management or drug and alcohol problems.
The Restorative Justice in Schools program is also expanding in 2013. For the past four years, it has handled cases where laws have been broken. However, officials are aware that there are other incidents where a restorative justice approach would be beneficial.
That might include behavioural issues, kids who don’t do their homework and bullying.
“This can deal with any problem where there’s conflict,” Ms Himmelman says. “What they’re trying to do is set up an entire restorative environment so that the whole school functions under that.”
Several schools in the Chester area are already working on similar efforts through the Schools Plus program. Thirty schools across the province, a number of them here in Lunenburg County, will be brought on stream next year.
While the bulk of the program will be done by school staff, community justice workers will act as resource people.
The two expansions have left community justice scrambling for volunteers. People don’t need to have any special knowledge of the law and will always be working with other trained facilitators.
“They just need to be people within the community who care about the general well-being of their community and helping these individuals get back on the right track,” Ms Himmelman says.
“The time commitment can vary depending on what they’re able to give,” she adds.
Volunteers must clear a criminal records check, then take 20 hours of training. Anyone wishing to volunteer or looking for more information about the program can contact Ms Himmelman at 543-1841.
 
 


Information Sharing Quick Reference Guide

14 Dec 2012

Friends For Life Training - French

13 Nov 2012

Province Releases Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

13 Nov 2012

SchoolsPlus Expands Into 48 More Schools

07 Nov 2012

Digby SchoolsPlus Site Officially Opens

27 Sep 2012

Kids and families from Digby and surrounding communities have more access to services and after-school activities with their SchoolsPlus site....

Read more at: http://www.ns.ndp.ca/news.asp?id=460


Students Benefit from SchoolsPlus initiative

11 Jul 2012

SchoolsPlus Expansion Continues

15 Mar 2012

SchoolsPlus Expansion Continues


Explore Life Winter 2012

25 Jan 2012

SchoolsPlus opens community room at Amherst Regional High School

30 Sep 2011

John Martin makes good use of its new youth health centre

22 Jul 2011

Restorative Practices Training In SRSB

06 May 2011

SchoolsPlus is a provincial model designed to improve the delivery of programs and services for children, youth and their families in Nova Scotia through a collaborative approach. An example of this collaboration was demonstrated on April 28th and 29th during two days of Restorative Practices training facilitated by Gola Taraschi. Ms. Taraschi has spent a number of years working with circles, restorative justice and alternative justice processes in both community and government settings. She is the developer and author of the Best Practice Standard and Learning Curriculum for the Restorative Justice Program of the Nova Scotia Department of Justice and is a licensed trainer for the International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP).

This training opportunity was coordinated by SchoolsPlus in collaboration with the African Canadian Services Division of the Department of Education and the Strait Regional School Board. Participants included administrators, teachers and teacher assistants of Chedabucto Education Centre/Guysborough Academy along with the school’s public health nurse and representatives from the Programs and Student Services Department.
Restorative practices are effective strategies for managing behavior and teaching people to take responsibility for their actions. The Restorative Practice Framework focuses on creating a healthier school community by learning how to better engage with each other in restorative ways. Relationships are the central focus in school communities and the best way to achieve healthy behaviours and stronger relationships is through restorative ways. All participants were challenged to think about their own practice and reflect on the challenges facing teachers and staff in schools today.
In September, the students and their families will have an opportunity to learn about Restorative Practices. Families will learn how to use Restorative Practices at home to strengthen relationships with children and foster healthy behaviours.  


Concrete Roots Brings Bboying to Local Schools

24 Feb 2011

YMCA Peace Medallion Recipient

29 Nov 2010

Congratulations Kevin Mapplebeck, Principal at West Highland's Elementary, on receiving the YMCA Peace Medallion. The YMCA Peace Medallion is awarded to individuals and groups who, without special resource, demonstrate in their lives and activities the values expressed in the World Alliance of YMCA's Statement of Peace: 
"Peace has many dimensions. It is not only a state of relationships among nations. We cannot expect to live in a world of peace if we are unable to live in peace with those close to us - even those who differ from us...The responsibility for peace begins with each person in relationship with family and friends, extends to community life and national activities..."
Kevin was nominated and recognized for his leadership and initiative in supporting West Highland students through Restorative Practices within the Schools Plus framework.


A Call for Greater Interdepartmental Delivery of Services to Youth and Families in Nova Scotia

29 Nov 2010

Our Kids Are Worth It: a provincewide youth strategy

14 May 2010

Respectful schools are happy schools

29 Apr 2010

Mental Health Identification and Navigation (MH-IN)

26 Apr 2010

GSA Conference at Forest Heights Community School

21 Apr 2010

Pilot program makes difference for troubled youth

21 Apr 2010